Just about bordering on odd, I see things through different eyes.The heading says it all - I live, I love, I craft, I am me...

13/11/2020

The making of Millie

 A few weeks ago, I tentatively applied to be part of a textile exhibition (I know - a little preemptive of me you will think seeing I have only really started sewing since lockdown....) There were some criteria - quite specific ones. None of which I filled ..... so instead I wrote how the theme of the exhibition still affected us today - specifically Himself ** , I then pressed submit and hoped that I might be considered.

The beginning of this week not only started with a Monday but it was accompanied by a thud of post through the door. I had been accepted and I had two weeks to complete my exhibit.

Meet my Making Millie - a linen doll designed to celebrate and to acknowledge the working women in the linen industry and the hardship and health hazards they had to endure.

Printed on a linen tea towel - still made in the original mills of Scotland and Ireland - Millie is fabric doll waiting to be decorated and sewn together then posted back to Scotland where she will be part of the display.

It did not take long for me to decide to paint directly onto the fabric before cutting out, then once dry, to work in thread onto the painted areas building up detail.

Over the course of a couple of days, I gave the black and white linen print layers of colour - I very quickly learnt that linen does not behave like paper! Which is kind of obvious however, I still, even with careful addition of paint or water found that the fabric disregarded my caution giving me 'interesting' marks and patterning.

However, after possibly a third mug of tea and a severe looking at and probably a dozen sighs and furrowed brows, the linen and I came to an understanding and we began to cooperate.


I did a little research on line to see if I could find out a little more about fabrics and textures of clothing worn by the working class women however unsurprisingly all the photos were in black and white and predominantly the clothing saved and in collections from that era were from mostly the wealthier classes - unsurprising really, the poor would have worn their clothing until it fell off them and used as rags or would have been cut down to make children's clothing, leaving very little left. 

This thought - of clothing being used until it was no longer usable struck a cord with me - directing me towards the next stage of Making Millie ..... more to come.
 

 **.. and why specifically Himself? I'll explain later.

19 comments:

  1. Now that is a challenge!! That is a very interesting project. I shall be watching out for your posts (not that I don't look forward to all of them LOL!) as I look forward to seeing how you are bringing Millie to life. The painting you have done up to now looks good! Curious your comment on working class clothing at that time...it is pure logic really ..isn't it? All the same it never occurred to me either the reason for there being little or no examples at all remaining. keep well Amanda x

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    1. You know something, when I thought about it - the reason there is very little poor or working class vintage clothing- it seemed so obvious I felt a little ashamed that it did not occur to me ๐Ÿ™„

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  2. Millie is lovely. I can't wait to see the next stage! Happy weekend!

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    1. Thanks Debi, I've got the next instalment planned soon ๐Ÿ˜Š

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  3. I love Millie! And I also love a bit of linen. What a wonderful project. Good job on painting the linen, that sounds tricky! Lulu x

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    1. Thank you Lulu, it's been fun learning something new ๐Ÿ˜Š

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  4. Well done for bringing Millie to life. Go to the top of the class for attempting this project. I like the idea of the paint and linen fighting so that you created interesting patterns and marks. Next post will be eagerly looked for! x

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    1. Aw thank you lovely lady, next instalment shortly!

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  5. You are "amazing"!!!! Creative, clever & so pro-active in whatever you put your mind too. Well done & I wish some would rub off on me. Your research has got me thinking about our long forgotten textile industry here & I'll do some research too. Thanks, take care, stay safe & huggles.

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    1. Enjoy your research! You might find something that inspires you to create๐Ÿ˜Š

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  6. Love Millie and look forward to seeing her take shape. The colours you have chosen are lovely. Happy slow stitching. ๐Ÿ’“xxx

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    1. Thank you, will post the next instalment soon๐Ÿ˜Š

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  7. Phew. That seems like a lot to do in two weeks. Good luck. Love the colouring and look forward to hearing more - especially about the theme of the exhibition and how it relates to Himself. Bx

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    1. I've nearly finished the bulk of what I'd like to do, just few more simple symbolic embellishments, then she's finished๐Ÿ˜Š

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  8. What an intriguing and wonderful project. A thought provoking post, thank you.

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  9. I've never seen anything like this before. I can't wait to see it finished. X

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