Just about bordering on odd, I see things through different eyes.The heading says it all - I live, I love, I craft, I am me...

14/12/2020

In which I mention walking, snow flakes, tasty treats, tree decorating and other similar festive asides

On Thursday,  after several postponements, social distancing requirements and the vagaries of the weather - I finally met up with National Trust rangers and an artistic researcher for a magical, wet and misty walk in the woods in Upper Wharfedale in the Yorkshire Dales. We were there to discuss an incredible joint venture.

We walked through Yokenthwaite Farm - already well known in the area for it's picturesque setting and the handmade porridge and granola business that originated from the farm. It now it is more widely recognised as being one of the more important farms in the latest James Herriot 'All creatures great and small' tv series.

The path took us up in to a straggly wood - now looking all the more sparse - not only due to the season but to the every increasingly prevalent Ash die back - a virus killing off all the native Ash trees across Europe. We were meeting to discuss a way of marking the demise and the long term loss such a large and statuesque tree has on the countryside.
It was a deeply interesting walk, mixing art with science, folk law and faerie stories, planning rejuvenation with installation, regeneration with public involvement and benefit.  It is going to be a long project.

As apprehensive as I am, this is something bigger than I have been involved with before and it is deeper with serious generational longevity and ecological significance - what a project to be part of. 

On a lighter note, our village trail on the theme of snowflakes is gathering pace (was a light flurry and now is becoming bit of a snowstorm!). It is lovely seeing all the decorations.

With 2020 being not a normal year (not that you need reminding) we have had to forgo our traditional festive wreathy day - the first time since 2004 we've not had one. This week, there is going to be a small (as in just myself, Youngest and GF) gathering and we are going to make wreaths and festive foliage ties. I usually just make for our home and a couple of special friends but this year I am going make as many as I can and gift them to those who can not get out to collect the greenery for themselves.
One of the traditions which happens every year during our festive wreathy making - a very dear friend, one who I dearly love, always brings a pepparkakor tree (a Swedish gingerbread) and seeing we were not getting together for the workshop, it was one more thing to mourn.
So you can imagine my delight when, on Saturday she unexpectedly turned up bearing the most beautifully gingery hot and spicy pepparkakor tree - she and her lovely partner sat outside, fingers wrapped around mugs of tea, while Himself and I sat at our doorway doing the same, as we had a sorely missed catch up.  Thank you wildaboutwords - your thoughtfulness still brings a lump to my throat xxxxx


Continuing with thank yous - thank you everyone who shared their festive bakes and recipes - they were amazing - some of you are prolific bakers (looking at you lovely lady) and if you are wondering what I am talking about - just follow this LINK to see some super tasty makes and bakes :)

Our next themed link up is this Friday and is 'Trees' - really looking forward to seeing your wonderful blogs xx

ps Talking of trees, I finally dressed mine this weekend, Himself brought in Treebeard (yes our chrimbly tree has a name and he lives freely in the garden) for me, I think we have had him frolicking in our garden for nine years now - he is looking little rough this year (mind you - don't we all?!) so I think his 2021 treat will be to be re-potted so he can spread his toes a little :D However, it is his time to shine - repotting can wait till warmer (drier) weather xx



15 comments:

  1. All best wishes for the ash project. I'm sure you will be a great imaginative and artistic asset to the team. Love your Christmas tree and its name - and glad it's looking a bit rough as then I don't feel so bad about ours, which has also been living wild in the garden and needs repotting! x

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    1. Thank you Belinda😊 yes poor old Treebeard is definitely tatty round the edges but at the moment ge is all twinkly and pretty so he doesn't mind🤣

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  2. Sadly we lost our little potted Christmas tree over the summer, but it had lasted for a few years. We had repotted it, but I think this summer ws just a bit too we for it. Your gifted Pepparkakor tree looks amazing ... what a lovely gift 💝

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    1. Quite a few folk said they lost the potted trees this summer. The Pepparkakor tree did not last long!

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  3. Your post is lovely and festive, what a lovely walk and it's such a shame about Ash tree disease so many beautiful trees destroyed because of it. I love your snowflakes cascading down your blog and the ones at the window. Your tree is beautiful, thank you for the links those goodies look amazing.

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  4. A thought on Ash dieback. There are two genetic variants of Ash in the British Isles. Only one is apparently susceptible to dieback.

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    1. I did not know that - shall look into that, but I do know that the ones we were looking at were all dead or on their way out- so may be they were all the susceptible species. :(

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  5. Treebeard looks wonderful. Sadly, I lost my little potted tree earlier in the year, so he needed to be replaced this Christmas.
    How very thoughtful of your friend to still visit and bring you the pepparkakor tree. It almost looks to good to eat. X

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    1. Thank you :) Quite a few folk said they lost the potted trees this summer. The Pepparkakor tree- it was a shame to demolish her work - but oh so tasty!

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  6. You are lucky to have been gifted a pepparkakor tree; shame about the wreath-making day and lack of a pepparkakor tree. Good luck in your new venture and I hope there will be future posts about it. x

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    1. Thank you - I shall certainly take photos as things happen - so I am hoping plenty stories to share :D x

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  7. Your inclusion in the new venture sounds thrilling & I look forward to hearing more about it over time. I was wondering about your wreath day & what a lovely idea to help others out too this year. I need to catch up with everyone as we've had i'net issues with maintenance on the National Broadband Network in our area, so hope to join on Friday now I'm back on line. Take care, stay safe & huggles.

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  8. I have been one of the lucky recipients of a beautiful wreath delivered today. Thank you. xx 💓 I have so missed our regular Wreathy Day - not to mention the delicious pepparkakor tree. Lovely that S and her partner were able to not only deliver you some of the gorgeous ginger biscuits but to be able to sit and chat - albeit outside. 💓🎄xx

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